Articles Tagged: alternative processes

Sunday Sun Prints at Klyde Warren Park

Today, I headed to Klyde Warren Park to have our monthly Sunday Sun Prints event. The fall breeze was a nice foil to the bright sun and the park teamed with life. I placed my bucket of water along with various objects on the table and invited kids to come and make a print of their own.

sunprints-klyde-warren-park-dallas-center-for-photography-1

Sun prints, also known as cynotypes, are an old photographic printing process that was created in 1842 by Sir Herschel Williams. Originally it was intended for reproducing scientific notes and architectural plans (hence the term blueprints). It works by treating the paper with ferric ammonium citrate and potassium ferricyanide and then exposing the paper to UV light. Whatever objects you place on the paper will be transposed onto it after being exposed to the sun and rinsed in water. The effect is a beautiful Prussian blue print that holds an artistic life of its own.

The kids’ reactions to the prints were priceless. Amazed, they would watch them float in water as their images began to appear. Looking up at me they would ask, “How does it work?”

“Magic,” I’d reply.

I try to make it out to KWP once a month to make sun prints. Check our Community Events calendar for the  next scheduled date!

sunprints-at-klyde-warren-park-dallas-center-for-photography-2

Ansel Adams Masterworks

There’s an Ansel Adams exhibit on at the Arlington Museum of Art running through August 3rd. As someone who grew up admiring his images, it was a thrill for me to be able to view 48 prints made in the darkroom by the photographer himself.

Unfortunately, that thrill was diminished by the way the photos were exhibited. The space felt like a high school gym and the lighting was poorly placed, resulting in reflections on the glazing of many of the prints. Still, it was wonderful to see the deep blacks of these silver gelatin prints and to stand in front of icons of photography, made by the photographer’s hand.

Ansel-Adams-Exhibit-Blog-PostDallas-Center-for-Photography