Articles Tagged: film

Our own Jillian makes it into the New Texas Talent show

Very rarely does a photograph of mine make it to print, let alone get displayed in a gallery. However, an image that I took of the singer, Lorde, made it into the New Texas Talent Show 2014 at the Craighead Green Gallery on Dragon Street.

I must confess. I absolutely love sneaking in my Canon AE-1 film camera into shows and snapping a few rolls of the performance. I live for the thrill of getting a camera with a detachable lens past security and then discreetly shooting the event. I headed over to Don’s Used Photo Equipment and debated between shooting in B&W or color. Todd looked at me and said, “Black and white is always classic.” Tri-X 400 it was!

Jillian-Patrick-Craighead-Green-Gallery-Dallas-Center-for-Photography-1

From the minute the show started I knew I was witnessing something special. At 17, Lorde knew how to command a stage, demand your attention and draw you into her world. I strained to see her through the packed venue but managed to find her around the heads and arms of the fans. The results of the night were a series of abstract images, slightly over exposed but strong and powerful with a point of view. My view.

 

The entire process of shooting, editing, submitting, framing and then displaying work was an incredibly rewarding experience. Peter helped me digitize my negative and print it for the show. This actually turned out to be harder than expected. I had my film processed at BWC and they had provided me with rough scans which I had turned in for the show. However, when Peter scanned the negative by shooting it with a Nikon D600 and a macro lens, there ended up being way more detail in the frame than what the initial scan had shown. Peter and I spent about 30 minutes recreating the rough scan from BWC. Those Lightroom sliders were all over the place!

The energy of gallery opening was tangible and my whole family showed up to support me. It felt satisfying seeing it hanging on the wall at the gallery, completely alive with the other pieces at the show. Peter stopped by as well and took a few shots of the event including this one of my uncle explaining to my grandfather what was happening in the photograph.

Jillian-Patrick-Craighead-Green-Gallery-4-Dallas-Center-for-Photography

SMU Historical Aerial Photos

I recently discovered that Southern Methodist University here in Dallas (SMU) has a nice online collection of historical photographs. Included is a group of photos titles “Miscellaneous Aerial Views of Dallas, 1930s-1940s”. They are a fascinating look at our city in earlier decades. The one below is titled “Mid-Town Business District” from 1935 and has call outs for the major buildings.

You can find the SMU photo collection here. The site is well worth spending some time on!

SMU-Dallas-Dallas-Center-for-Photography

Ansel Adams Masterworks

There’s an Ansel Adams exhibit on at the Arlington Museum of Art running through August 3rd. As someone who grew up admiring his images, it was a thrill for me to be able to view 48 prints made in the darkroom by the photographer himself.

Unfortunately, that thrill was diminished by the way the photos were exhibited. The space felt like a high school gym and the lighting was poorly placed, resulting in reflections on the glazing of many of the prints. Still, it was wonderful to see the deep blacks of these silver gelatin prints and to stand in front of icons of photography, made by the photographer’s hand.

Ansel-Adams-Exhibit-Blog-PostDallas-Center-for-Photography

 

It was thirty years ago today. . .

It’s been 30 years since Peter Poulides was named one of the great travel photographers in the December 1983 issue of Travel and Leisure.  He came to my office, dropped the issue on my desk and laughed that we should do a “throw back Thursday” post on the blog.  I was amused.  30 years ago, if someone said write a blog post on #tbt they would not know what you meant.  Yet, here we are.

I pick up the magazine and look at the cover.  It is endearing.  His mother wrote what page he was featured on in the middle of the forehead of the girl on the front.  As I thumb through the 126 pages to get there, I skip over a multitude of early 80s ads for cars and alcohol.

Peter-Poulides-Travel-and-Leisure-1983-Dallas-Center-for-Photography-01Peter-Poulides-Travel-and-Leisure-1983-Dallas-Center-for-Photography-02

I get to the article and the list of photographers is impressive.   I immediately recognize some of the greats – Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Mary Ellen Mark and Arnold Newman.  Each photographer has a featured photograph and I see Peter’s image of the Greek church in Mykonos.

There is a common quality between all of the photographs in this spread and I see it clearly in Peter’s shot – stillness.  This does not mean that there is not movement and energy in these photographs.  What it means is that there is an arrested motion – a suspension that is so delicate that one more moment later, it will be destroyed.

“I was there with my partner, a writer, photographing for about 45 minutes,” Peter says in the article.  “Finally, she became cold, began shivering and wanted to leave.  I started to pack things up, turned my shoulders and was about to leave, but looked back and said, ‘just one more shot.’ This is it.”

Henri Cartier-Bresson coined this concept as “the decisive moment.”  It is the moment when all of the elements come together and for a split second are in complete alignment.  They are at peace with one another.

A good photographer is aware of these moments.  A great photographer is an essential element of the moment.

Travel-Photography-Dallas-Center-for-Photography

 

Heavy Metal Department

Wookie love

Miss Corkern’s 3rd grade class

I was going through some boxes of papers and photos that my Mom left behind when she passed away and came across this little gem. This is Miss Corkern’s 3rd grade class at Richardson Heights Elementary in 1962. Yup, that’s me, looking off camera and probably wondering if that key light is at a 2:1 ratio with the fill.

Miss-Corkerns-3rd-grade-class-Dallas-Center-for-Photography