Making and Using a Pinhole Camera

Photography unplugged! In a full day of low-tech photo fun you’ll make and use a camera that you build yourself and find out how photos were made before digital.
Upcoming Workshops

No workshops currently scheduled

You don’t need a digital camera to have creative photo fun. In this full day workshop we will make and use our own pinhole cameras in a low-tech, hands-on experience merging the wonders of science and art.

Pinhole cameras can be made from an array of household items but in this workshop we’ll use a cardboard oatmeal container, a soda can, black electrician’s tape and a straight pin. It’s as simple as that! The pinhole camera is a real camera and functions with the same basic principles as all film and digital cameras. Along with learning how to make and use pinhole cameras, you will get a chance to develop images using traditional darkroom methods and chemicals. You’ll come away understanding the scientific principles of light and imaging that are shared by the pinhole cameras, the human eye and modern digital cameras.

You’ll start the day by building your own camera and producing a variety of in-camera paper negatives and direct positive prints. Later in the day, you will have the opportunity to experiment with exposure times or double exposures and create an additional camera from a variety of containers such as old film canisters. You can even go off site to take photos and return to develop in the darkroom.

This is the perfect companion to our Cyanotype workshop since you’ll be able to use negatives from this session to make contact Cyanotype prints.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

  • How to build pinhole cameras
  • How to load and shoot with pinhole cameras
  • A brief history of the science of photography as well as the history of photography as an art form
  • Darkroom processing
  • Creative exploration of both negative and positive prints
  • Final critique and sharing of discoveries made during the creative process

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • Something to take notes with
  • An empty Quaker Oats brand 18oz container with lid. The other brands don’t work as well because of the materials so stick with Quaker! Also the larger Quaker containers don’t work so just the 18oz size please.
  • An empty soda can

 

  • Cost per person is $240 early registration, $260 late registration.
  • Workshop price includes lunch and a $15 materials and chemistry lab fee.
  • Doors open at 8:45am.
  • Workshop starts promptly at 9am and ends at 5pm.
  • Advance registration and payment is required.
  • Maximum number of students is 12, minimum number to make a class is 8.
  • Parking is available on the street or in the adjacent lot at Electric Light & Power.
  • Bring a soda can and an empty Quaker Oats brand 18oz container with lid. The other brands don’t work as well because of the materials so stick with Quaker! Also the larger Quaker containers don’t work so just the 18oz size please.

Q: Is lunch included in the workshop?
A: Yes, we will be bringing in lunch.

Q: How will I know if a workshop makes or not?
A: If a class doesn’t make and has to be cancelled, you will receive an email no later than 2 days before the scheduled class date.

Q: What if I have to cancel?
A: Details on cancellations are on our Policies page.

Q: I have other questions. Who do I contact?
A: That’s easy. Use the Contact page to email us directly with any questions.

Hillary DeParde

Hillary is a fine art photographer with more than twenty years’ experience specializing in film photography. Using manual film cameras and traditional darkroom methods, she creates classic black and white portraits with a soulful and timeless quality.

She has extensive experience as an arts educator, teaching visual arts to both young people and adults in a variety of settings, ranging from private arts institutions to public schools. Her strength as an educator comes from her ability to draw on her visual arts degree, her skills as a working artist and her ability to guide students of all ages through the creative process. Sharing her love of the art, science and magic of film photography has been her most rewarding teaching experience.

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